Tag Archives: Margaret Mitchell

Top 10 Influential Books

24 Apr

I got this idea from the blog Photographs Make Memories, and thought it was a really nice idea, and decided to do one for myself. Yesterday was the International Day of the Book, so ideally I would have posted this then, but being true to my self I’m always a bit late to the party 😉

1. The Harry Potter-series – J.K Rowling

Might be a bit cheating to put a whole series in first place, but hopefully no one will arrest me. I was so lucky to grow up with Harry Potter, I think I was just the right age when the series started, so as new books came out I would roughly be about the same age. As I grew older and taste in books changed, the HP-books changed as well, so I never grew out of loving reading them. When The Deathly Hallows came out it was really the end of an era, and I almost didn’t want to finish it, knowing I’d never wait for the next one to be released. I spent so much time completely engaged in the Hogwarts-world, that it almost feels like a second home, and it’s one that I keep coming back to. I will never ever tire of picking up the books and giving them a good re-read.

2. The Little Prince – Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

The book I remember most from my early childhood. This was the first book with a proper story that my mum would read to me, repeatedly, and one of the books that made me learn to read myself. After a while with my mum having to read it for me, I became determined (so I’ve been told) to learn to do it by myself, so I could read it anytime I wanted, without depending on an adult to do it for me. Good motivation! Such a wonderful little book, and I hope any future kid of mine will feel the same.

3. Animorphs-series – K.A. Applegate

Another series that stayed with me quite a time. There were 54+ books after all! This was before Harry Potter my favourite books at the time. I guess they aren’t literary masterpieces, but who cares about that when you’re 8-12? And I still love them in that nostalgic way, the story was so exciting, and I came to really love the characters. I think the characters themselves are what makes these books so important to me, I felt I could identify a little bit with all of them, and also learn quite a bit. Animorphs is actually one of the book-series I really wish would be made into films, that would be brilliant! (We don’t talk about that horrible TV-show).

4. Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell

I’m pretty sure Gone With The Wind was the first proper book I read that was not children’s literature, at least that was not for school. We owned a really old copy of it at home, which was in a very old-fashioned language (Norwegian language has changed A LOT through the years), and at first I though all adult books were written in that strange way. It must have taken me ages to get through the first time, I was probably around 9, and even though I didn’t really understand most of the themes, I still loved it. Perhaps because I felt it was such an achievement at the time. I still pick up my copy now and then and give it a re-read, as I do with all my favourite books. Scarlett O’Hara is in my opinion one of the most interesting characters I’ve ever read, and taught my that the main character does not always have to be very sympathetic for us to like reading about them.

5. The Bone Collector – Jeffery Deaver

There was a period of time I was really into crime fiction, where I would read it ALL THE TIME! I still do from time to time, but not as much as before. My obsession lasted quite a while though, from when I was about 13-18! I think crime fiction often gets a bad rep, as “cheap” and poorly written, which I strongly disagree with! There are many fantastic crime novels out there, and Jeffery Deaver is one of my favourite authors in the genre. His series of books with Lincoln Rhyme as the main character is one of my favourites, they are well written and Deaver always keeps the reader at their toes to the final page. I’ve spent so many hours of my life engaged in these thrilling stories, and it all started with The Bone Collector. Great book!

6. Lord of the Rings – J.R.R. Tolkien

There’s no way I couldn’t have Lord of the Rings here, the Tolkien-universe is such a big part of my life. I’m a fanatic! I love the books and movies, and I completely lost count on how many times I’ve re-read them! I watched the first LotR-film when I was 11, and at that point I hadn’t read the books at all. Luckily we had a copy at home, and I think I actually sat down and started reading right after coming home from the movie, I had to find out how it all ended. I did,and I completely fell in love with Middle-Earth and its characters. And through the following obsession I discovered communities online consisting of other fans, and I guess it introduced me to the “fandom life”.

7. Les Misérables – Victor Hugo

My first introduction to Les Mis was not the novel, but the musical. I first watched it on DVD when I was five years old and loved it. Of course there was no way I could read the book at such a young age, but I knew that someday I’d be old enough, and it was something I actually looked forward to for years! I first gave it a go when I was around 10/11 I think, and I got through it on pure stubbornness. It was an extremely tough read, but an enjoyable one. I waited a few years before reading it again, and probably got a lot more out of it second time around now!

8. David Copperfield – Charles Dickens

I’m really fond of Victorian literature, and especially Dickens, so he deserves taking one of the spots on my list. My favourite book of his is no doubt David Copperfield, mainly because of the characters and their journey. I mean, it’s basically a coming-of-age story, just set in Victorian times!  I’ve decided that in the future, when I hope to be surrounded by dogs, they will all be named after Dickens-characters.

9. High Fidelity – Nick Hornby

High Fidelity is one of my favourite contemporary novels! It was the one that introduced me to Nick Hornby, and he has become one of my most beloved authors. I love his writing style, it’s so straightforward, a bit quirky, very funny and heartwarming. I loved almost every Hornby-novel I read (only exception is “How To Be Good), and I always recommend them to anyone who wants a good read that’s not too heavy.

10. A Song of Ice and Fire-series – George R.R. Martin

A Song of Ice and Fire is my newest obsession, and even though I only started reading the books about two years ago, I’ve actually read them all 3 times now! I, like many others, started because of the TV-show, but it quickly become much more than just a book series to me. Like with Lord of the Rings and Harry Potter, it has introduced me to a wonderful community of fans, earning it a spot on my list. It is truly one of the most complex stories I have ever read, and I find myself completely lost in its universe at times. I won’t stay for too long though, as the mortally rate is high 😉

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